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What is Social Prescribing?

Many things affect your health and wellbeing. GPs tell us that a lot of people visit them feeling isolated or lonely. Or they might be stressed out by work, money and housing problems. Sometimes it’s the stress of managing different long-term conditions.

That’s where social prescribing comes in. It starts with a conversation. It might be the conversation you’ve just had with your doctor. Or with another person in the practice team. They will refer you to a social prescribing link worker.

The link worker is there to listen to you, and put you in touch with the people and activities that might help you to feel better.

Your link worker might introduce you to a community group, a new activity or a local club. Or they might help you fid legal advice or debt counselling. They might just help you fid information and guidance: a bit of inside knowledge on your situation or what local resources there are. They could even support you to create something new such as a gardening club, a fihing group, a ‘men’s shed’ or knit and knatter group.

Social prescribing can help you to have more control over your own health and fid ways to improve how you feel in a way that suits you

How can Social Prescribing help you?

  • Improve how you feel in a way that suits you
  • Have more control over your own health and well-being
  • Connect you to a local group or activity
  • Provide you with information or guidance about local resources and service

Studies show that people get better and feel better faster than those treated with medicine alone. And because it works, it’s happening more and more – including here in this area.

For more information about social prescribing visit www.england.nhs.uk/personalisedcare/social-prescribing/

New guidance has been issued for the use of the Oxford AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine.

This follows further reviews by the independent regulator, the MHRA, and the Commission for Human Medicines, of a very small number of people in the UK who have developed a rare blood-clotting condition since having the Oxford AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine.

The MHRA and Joint Committee for Vaccinations and Immunisations have emphasised that the risk of this condition is extremely small and that the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks for the vast majority of people. They have recommended that:

  • Everyone who has had the AstraZeneca vaccine should still have a second dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine, irrespective of age, unless they suffered any serious side effects after their first vaccination.
  • People aged 30 and over or who have a health condition that puts them at higher risk of severe Covid-19 disease should still be offered the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine.  The benefits in protecting them against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition.
  • People aged 18-29 who do not have a health condition that puts them at higher risk of severe Covid-19 disease will be offered an alternative Covid-19 vaccine where available.  (This has been recommended as a precaution as people under 30 are at less risk from Covid-19 and not because they are considered to be at particular risk of developing the rare blood clot.)
  • People under 30 can still choose to have the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine if this will mean they can be protected more quickly and they have been made aware of the guidance.

 Please see the leaflet below that has been produced by Public Health England and the NHS to answer any questions you may have

 Leaflet on COVID-19 vaccination and blood clotting